Who Am I?

As I pondered the sermon this week I kept thinking about the Casting Crown’s song, Who Am I?  After reflecting on the question of self identity the chorus strings together a series of scriptural images regarding the brevity of life:

I am a flower quickly fading,
Here today and gone tomorrow,
A wave tossed in the ocean,
A vapor in the wind.
Considering the enormity of God (as I’ve attempted to do the past two weeks) indeed our years are just a passing breeze and our entire existence is as a speck of dust living on grain of sand in a universe beyond human comprehension.  AND YET, the Psalmist reminds us that we were created a little lower than the heavenly beings, crowned with glory and honor and made rulers of all things here on earth.  (Psalm 8:5ff)
The fact that sin has so contaminated us that our very nature now is sinful, has never changed God’s view of our purpose and reason for existence.  Because of his great love for us he sent his son to cleanse us from sin that we might be an untarnished reflection of his image on earth.  Thus the second part of the Casting Crown’s song reflects God’s great concern for us:
Still you hear me when I’m calling,
Lord, you catch me when I’m falling,
And you’ve told me who I am.
I am yours.
I am yours.
 
Thank you Lord!  What a Savior!
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Byron FikePreaching Minister

Byron has been the preaching minister at Clear Lake since 1999. He and his wife have three grown children, who have also devoted their lives to serving the Lord. In his personal time, Byron likes to read books, watch movies, and play with his little dog Willie. He also is an avid follower of Alabama football, having grown up in Tuscaloosa during the glory days of Bear Bryant.

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3 Responses to “Who Am I?”

  1. avatar Anonymous says:

    I think the danger man has always been in is getting confused on who God is and who we are. Instead of realizing that we are made in God's image, we make God in our image, and in turn put all our imperfections on him.
    But when we realize that he is this perfect being, that created each one of us, and desires to know each of us intimately, even though we only exist on this tiny speck of dust, and our life is like a vapor, it truly is humbling.

  2. avatar Skull Jockey says:

    This is an area that I struggle with and can lead me down the road of Deism, that God actually interacts with his creation. It's so humbling, it's almost unbelievable. I guess that's why we have faith.

  3. avatar tommytwotoez says:

    Maybe this is why the Greeks thought that Jesus being the Christ was foolishness. Their gods mere a mirror image to their own flawnessess. I guess they wanted a god who was rational in relation to human rationality.

    Maybe the Intimate has become a stumbling block for Pharisaic Christians today. Looking up at the heavens and seeing ourselves as only the “pale blue dot” causes us to recoile and trip over the thought of a Abba Father who wants to be close and is close to us.

    It is very humbling considering these characteristics of God. It is so much more than Deism, it is perfect love. In prayer the psalmist David reminds me of the handy work of God through Creation. In prayer Jesus reminds me of the intimacy of the cross. The Creator of all this, known and unknown, willingly died for us, for me. A tiny microbe of dust worthy of His love and life. This revalation moves me to fall face first on the floor, with spit and tear I cry out, “ABBA, FATHER…”

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